Theorizing Social Inquiry: Contemporary Debates

Theorizing Social Inquiry: Contemporary Debates

University of Edinburgh, Friday 6th May, 2016, 1-5.30pm

Summary: This symposium will address contemporary theoretical debates about social science as a form of inquiry – as an active, ongoing process of knowledge production.  Areas of debate include how the conditions of production shape social scientific knowledge, as well as how to best develop and support inquiry: through the adoption of a dialogic stance, a general framework for research, an innovative writing style, or something else?  Some of the issues that will be explored are:

  • the external institutional conditions that frame and shape objectivity in inquiry
  • the politics of knowledge-production within the academy
  • whether innovative writing styles hamper or facilitate inquiry
  • how to theorize social inquiry as a dialogic enterprise
  • whether or not social theory should try to provide a general framework as the basis for empirical inquiry

Details

  • Date and Time: Friday 6th May, 2016, 1-5.30pm
  • Venue: 6th floor staff/common room, Chrystal Macmillan Building, 15A George Square, Edinburgh University, EH8 9LD
  • Entry is free but please contact Steve Kemp if you are planning to attend on:

s.kemp@ed.ac.uk

Speakers and Titles

Plenary Speaker:

John Holmwood (Nottingham University): “Revisiting Objectivity”

Other Speakers:

Justin Cruickshank (Birmingham University): “Inquiry and the Dialogic Development of Knowledge: From ‘Metaphysics as a Conceptual Science’ in Critical Realism to Gadamer and the Finitude of Being”

Lisa Kalayji (Edinburgh University): “Feminist/Sociology: Knowledge Production under the Spectre of Postfeminism”

Steve Kemp (Edinburgh University): “How important is fallibility to progress in social inquiry?”

Stephen Shirlaw (Independent Scholar): “Bridge-building to create sociocultural theory frameworks : the two challenges of interdisciplinarity and micro-dynamics.”

Angelica Thumala (Edinburgh University): “Sociology as literature. Do poetic and other innovative writing styles hamper or advance inquiry?”


Categories: Committing Sociology

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