Theorizing the Web 2017 April 7 & 8 in NYC!

The seventh annual Theorizing the Web is April 7 & 8 at the Museum of the
Moving Image. That’s in almost two weeks! We hope to see old friends and
new faces so if you think you’ll be in the NYC please stop by! Register and
pay our whatever-you-want registration fee by April 5 to attend the
conference and get full access to the Museum of the Moving Image:
http://theorizingtheweb.tumblr.com/2017/registration

If you don’t think you can attend in NYC there’s always the internet! To
join us remotely, visit
http://theorizingtheweb.tumblr.com/2017/livestream during
the conference and you’ll see all the streams. Ask the panelists questions
and contact other attendees through the conference hashtag #TtW17. Each
panel has its own dedicated hashtag too, so you can interact with specific
panel sessions. If you’re a part of a watch party, cool! Please drop us a
line and let us know.

The full program is here: http://theorizingtheweb.tumblr.com/2017/program

Thank you and hope to see lots of you next month!

-David Banks / @da_banks / co-chair

*About Theorizing the Web:*
Theorizing the Web is an inter- and non-disciplinary annual conference that
brings together scholars, journalists, artists, activists, and technology
practitioners to think conceptually and critically about the
interrelationships between the Web and society. We deeply value public
engagement, and consider insights from academics, non-academics, and
non-“tech theorists” alike to be equally valuable.

The first Theorizing the Web conference was held in 2011 at the University
of Maryland, as was the second in 2012. In 2013, the conference moved to
New York, where it was hosted by the CUNY Graduate Center in Manhattan. In
2014 we moved outside of institutional settings into a Windmill Studios
warehouse in Brooklyn and expanded to two full days of programming. The
2015 event moved back to Manhattan, on the Bowery, to the then-unfinished
new International Center of Photography space. In 2016 and 2017, we’re at
our third borough, in the beautiful spaces within the Museum of the Moving
Image in Queens.

The Friday and Saturday daytime sessions feature 18 panels created largely
from the competitive submissions we received at the beginning of the year,
and the evenings conclude with four keynotes that will take place in the
museum’s Redstone Theater. Keynote panelists include Adrian Chen, Jay
Rosen, Zeynep Tufekçi, Sharon Zukin, and many more.


Categories: Conferences, Digital Sociology

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