Comments for The Sociological Imagination http://sociologicalimagination.org A daily dose of the Sociological Imagination Tue, 14 Oct 2014 19:00:51 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on 7 ways to use a blog as a research journal by Nam Tranhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16156/comment-page-1#comment-126913 Tue, 14 Oct 2014 19:00:51 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16156#comment-126913 Great article! Who would’ve thought to turn notes or highlights from books into blog posts.

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Comment on What’s the difference between ‘public intellectualism’ and being unusually willing to talk about stuff in public? by Patrick Ainleyhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16117/comment-page-1#comment-126808 Mon, 13 Oct 2014 10:22:00 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16117#comment-126808 Looking at recent ‘conversations’, it seems to me a lot of our self-styled academic ‘public intellectuals’ just publish on blogs as well as in journals to raise their profile and not because they have anything to say consistent with the issue to hand or indeed anything worthwhile to say at all!

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Comment on The Power of Cartoons by หุ่นยนต์กระดาษแข็ง “กันดั้ม”_Mobile Suit Gundam_การ์ตูนญี่ปุ่น:: The power of cartoonshttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/2216/comment-page-1#comment-126482 Thu, 09 Oct 2014 03:43:00 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=2216#comment-126482 […] The Power of Cartoons  BY SOCIOLOGICAL IMAGINATION ON NOVEMBER 21, 2010 […]

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Comment on What the other social sciences can learn from economics by Sociological Imaginationhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/13997/comment-page-1#comment-126035 Thu, 02 Oct 2014 21:16:03 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=13997#comment-126035 That’s a VERY interesting question. I’ve just posed it on twitter.

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Comment on What the other social sciences can learn from economics by David Walkerhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/13997/comment-page-1#comment-126009 Thu, 02 Oct 2014 13:26:07 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=13997#comment-126009 As someone who has spent a good part of a career in journalism interested in/disseminating social science, let me offer a partial answer to the question in the last paragraph.
1. it’s not ‘popularisation’ (which has a sniff of snobbery and/or epistemological absolutism about it), but application of the rule of thumb news writers apply (which of course is not ideology free) …does this quicken the blood/interest the hard-bitten desk editors/ pass the ‘so what’ test. Economics stuff tends to have a higher ratio of passes because
2 (subject to empirical analysis) the kinds of things economists are interested in are the kinds of things that intermediaries (who would go out of business if they were too far off the public’s general interests) are excited by ..tax, money, fairness, business, jobs etc. The ‘arena of interest’ also includes gender, family, power – the subject matter more often of the other social sciences – but their output doesn’t hit this spot often enough.
Here’s a thought experiment. The Institute for Fiscal Studies is supremely successful at subjecting public conversation (especially initiated by politicians) to disciplined analysis and critique, usually economics led. Were there, say, an Institute for Social Policy, in what circumstances and over what output might it command the attention the IFS does.
And, a question for social scientists, are there enough practitioners of sociology and social policy to step up and do what Paul Johnson and colleagues do with such effect?

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Comment on Žižek as a player of paradoxes by Kubilay Akmanhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16005/comment-page-1#comment-125849 Mon, 29 Sep 2014 21:04:32 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16005#comment-125849 I agree with Mark Carrigan in several aspects and hope to discuss this topic further with another text. There are a couple of questions to be asked on Zizek and after that he can be located much more properly to his place in intellectual history.

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Comment on Why are modern pianists so boring? by Benjamin Geerhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16058/comment-page-1#comment-125637 Fri, 26 Sep 2014 07:53:27 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16058#comment-125637 Also, how relevant are recitals at a time when most people listen only to recorded music? And aren’t, say, Keith Jarrett and Michael Wollny pianists?

Perhaps the issue here isn’t piano per se, but the whole social structure known as classical music.

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Comment on Why are modern pianists so boring? by Benjamin Geerhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16058/comment-page-1#comment-125636 Fri, 26 Sep 2014 07:42:42 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16058#comment-125636 “Who, since, let’s say, Shostakovich (and even this is stretching a point), has written piano music that genuinely holds its place in the recital repertoire?”

There’s György Ligeti, whose Études for piano are frequently played at piano competitions and have been recorded several times.

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Comment on Escher Girls: bodies don’t work that way…. by Dan Fairbrotherhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15857/comment-page-1#comment-125370 Thu, 25 Sep 2014 11:11:57 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15857#comment-125370 Ok. Apologies for hitting “post” twice.

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Comment on Escher Girls: bodies don’t work that way…. by Sociological Imaginationhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15857/comment-page-1#comment-125188 Wed, 24 Sep 2014 11:17:37 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15857#comment-125188 Sure, will give me time to think about what do I actually believe here qua sociologist – what sociological content there has been to my claim (which I’ve basically just been restating) concerns the empirical growth of the men’s rights movement, as a social movement, as well as theoretical claim about how discursive agenda setting can escape the intentions of agents party to it (e.g. liberal critics of Islam inadvertently contributing to Islamophobia or ‘liberal’ interventionists strengthening the conservative agenda after 9/11). If you’re talking very specifically about the origins and operation of gender based harm via cultural representations, I honestly have no idea, I’ve never really thought about it in any serious way or read any relevant literature, beyond an MA feminist theory module I took years ago. If you read back to the opening post, it was a plug for an interesting blog and a brief statement of what I took to be the ‘sinister absurdity’ of these representations when presented side-by-side, not a considered contribution to the sociology of gender.

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