Comments for The Sociological Imagination http://sociologicalimagination.org A daily dose of the Sociological Imagination Fri, 05 Dec 2014 12:01:26 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Improvisation in academic life by Research presentations from hell | The Research Companionhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15289/comment-page-1#comment-130033 Fri, 05 Dec 2014 12:01:26 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15289#comment-130033 […] 05.12.14 This post on Improvisation in academic life contains some useful reflections on being a flexible speaker/presenter (although I suspect the […]

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Comment on Self-tracking and ‘techorexia’ by Milahttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/14791/comment-page-1#comment-129950 Wed, 03 Dec 2014 22:05:11 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=14791#comment-129950 As someone in remission from an eating disorder, I find these devices unhealthy for those who have ED or compulsive tendencies just as much as for those who do not. They are absolutely oversimplified. People have forgotten to listen to what their body is asking for, whether it be sleep, activity, or type of food because they get hung up on some number. Depending on our state of health, we have varying needs.

The calorie counting game is obnoxious and needs to stop. It has been shown that our ‘standard’ 2000 calorie diet is hardly sufficient for the ‘average’ person anywhere from 10-45 years old, yet 2000 calories is pretty much law in many doctor’s offices. Next comes the ‘10,000 steps a day’ rule. Human beings are far too complex to reduce them to a number, and that includes the number on the scale.

Thanks for writing this. My family lives by the numbers on the treadmill, fitbit, scale, waistband, and food label. And because of that behavior I endangered my health and my life for 12 years. Strangely enough, after treatment, ALL my ‘numbers’ on my lab work are finally perfectly in range. And I don’t count a damn thing.

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Comment on Self-tracking and ‘techorexia’ by Tinahttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/14791/comment-page-1#comment-129832 Mon, 01 Dec 2014 02:13:31 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=14791#comment-129832 I agree that these self-tracking apps can enable those with obsessive-compulsive tendencies to keep engaging in that behavior. As someone currently recovering from OCD and an eating disorder that was rooted in an obsession about my health, the rising use of these self-tracking apps is concerning to me, and I hope it’s a passing trend. Maybe my perspective is a little skewed, but in my life i’ve found that obsession with health is probably the most unhealthy thing there is.

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Comment on Carol Smart: “ideas come about through the process of writing” by Patrick Ainleyhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16327/comment-page-1#comment-129822 Sun, 30 Nov 2014 19:06:16 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16327#comment-129822 Or rather that’s one way ideas come about. More important tho is whether they are good ideas or not!

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Comment on A Conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah on Britishness by Angela Kennedyhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15885/comment-page-1#comment-129818 Sun, 30 Nov 2014 16:56:37 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15885#comment-129818 Hi Sadia, thank you very much indeed for discussing this with me. The comments I was concerned about are these: “I think the mainstream are trying to portray Britain as civilised, as opposed to those Muslims and those other people who have really negative views on women and so on. I don’t say women are living the best of situations in some parts of the world, I know there are issues, but the idea that the western woman is completely liberated, especially the British woman, and so we need to go out there and civilise these people.” Obviously this was part of an oral conversation – where syntax and sentence construction is a lot different from written, so it may very well be that what I’ve tentatively interpreted is not what Benjamin meant. It looked to me that he was (possibly) accepting the notion that ‘the western woman is completely liberated, especially the British woman’ and that his problem was with a notion that British women’s liberation needed to be ‘spread’ towards the ‘uncivilised’. But I do accept (and hope) that it is completely possible he was problematizing the whole notion that British women are somehow ‘completely liberated’ and living in ‘the best of situations’. It would be good to get that clarified.

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Comment on 38 reasons why you should blog about your research by Rudy Owenshttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/13910/comment-page-1#comment-129793 Sun, 30 Nov 2014 02:57:58 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=13910#comment-129793 It allows ideas to be shared and contested quickly and it can allow research to be shared with the public outside of the fee-based firewall (like Elsevier) that keeps most publicly funded research from being shared with the public and many policy-makers. Lastly, it forces researchers to write in accessible language, not wonkese. If no one reads your research, will it matter. A blog makes it matter, vitally.

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Comment on 38 reasons why you should blog about your research by Yes, public health blogging makes a difference | I Wonder and Wanderhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/13910/comment-page-1#comment-129789 Sat, 29 Nov 2014 23:47:43 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=13910#comment-129789 […] member, and you have not been exposed by your peers or the faculty to the value of blogging, here 38 reasons why you need to get off your freaking butt right now and get to work. If you work in a public health […]

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Comment on A Conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah on Britishness by Sadia Habibhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15885/comment-page-1#comment-129785 Sat, 29 Nov 2014 18:44:17 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15885#comment-129785 Hi Angela, Thank you for taking the time to read and comment. I would not use all the interview with school students, perhaps only some sections. I love the idea of using at undergraduate level. Regarding Benjamin’s comments on gender inequalities/stratification, I too hope (and think) he was not neglecting the importance of it, I think like you said in the conversation, his mind was probably consumed by so many different angles/aspects of Britishness, that sometimes some points were not fully elaborated upon. I would like to think he does check his male privilege. Would you be able to let me know which particular statement(s) struck you as problematic, and maybe if I am able to, I can ask him to clarify. Thank you again.

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Comment on Human/animal cognition and the attribution of causal powers by Sociological Imaginationhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/16288/comment-page-1#comment-129781 Sat, 29 Nov 2014 14:41:01 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=16288#comment-129781 clever creatures!

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Comment on A Conversation with Benjamin Zephaniah on Britishness by Angela Kennedyhttp://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/15885/comment-page-1#comment-129778 Sat, 29 Nov 2014 12:57:40 +0000 http://sociologicalimagination.org/?p=15885#comment-129778 This was a most interesting interview, full of nuanced insights by Benjamin: to the point I personally would use this as a teaching aid for students at undergraduate level (though I’d argue that it would be an effective resource as part of any ‘learning about Britishness’ in school). I do feel, however, that there were possible problems in how he categorizes gender inequalities and stratification generally, but perhaps especially in Britain. There sadly remains the myth that gender inequality and, crucially, ‘jeopardies’ from gender stratification, are at most minor in the UK, that women here are ‘liberated’. But feminisation of poverty; violence against women; sexual ‘colonisation'; unequal pay and career opportunities; and devaluing of the caring labour women in which women are most often engaged are just some of the major ways in which women’s lives, health, well-being and opportunities are endangered, every day, in the UK, whatever their age, class, race or ethnicity, health/impairment status, sexuality, body size, whether cis/trans/queer, or other form of stratification to which they are subject. It wasn’t clear to me that Benjamin understood this, but this may have been an effect of a informal conversation where he had a lot of interesting and useful comments to make and that particular point got lost. On the other hand, I am often dismayed at how many men fail to check their male privilege, and I would hope this wasn’t the case with Benjamin.

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